Head Liquid Metal 8 Tennis Racquet Review


The tennis racquet being used is an important asset to a player’s performance, it can ensure a winning serve or give way to crushing defeat. To be able to play well in tennis, you must have a good foundation and a good foundation includes a quality tennis racquet.

The design of racquets has evolved each year and by nature, the prices have increased as well. This revelation can be a demoralising one for beginners who don’t require high-end gear and only want to dip their feet into the world of competitive tennis, these hefty prices can definitely deter intrigued observers of the sport from ever stepping onto a tennis court.

The quality of cheap tennis racquets are questionable at best but if you can pick up a decent racquet from Head at a reasonable price then you can’t ask for moire than that. The Head Liquid Metal 8 Tennis Racquet is here to provide a sturdy yet inexpensive solution, does it deliver though? We’ll find out.

Power

The strength of fundamentals will always prevail over a poor quality tennis racquet, so a beginner will never need the best gear available. A barebones racquet is a wise choice as it doesn’t sugarcoat things in regards to positioning, understanding mechanics and topspin application.

It puts these obstacles in front of the player to conquer, unaided no less. The Head Liquid Metal 8 Tennis Racquet is a rather simple yet effective product, relying on the skill of its holder and pushing them to improve through pure practice.

That’s not to downplay the racquet’s special features as it has a few that make it standout, its most significant feature has to do with power, the sweet spot is relatively large and enables a major power blow with a complete swing. The racquet can rebound a blisteringly fast ball with the same force and speed, it’s extremely useful for heavy swings and long ball shots. The Liquidmetal technology is to thank for its relatively high power output, lessening the physical effort needed on the player to pull off strong shots in the process.

Control

The liquid metal-based tennis racquet isn’t a slouch in other areas as well, control is well done via the implementation of NoShox, this system reduces vibrational sensations through the use of a memory foam stuffed handle, extending to a better grasp during intensive/competitive sequences. According to comparisons, this racquet is 27% more disruption-free than other racquets on the market. The inbuilt string dampener reduce vibrations stemming from other parts of the racquet, lessening nasty echo-effects of general movement. The HydroSorb branded grip features a dual-hub system with high-grade ventilation, freeing pressure spots and improving your grasp on the handle.

The lightweight size allows for freer movements and lesser strain than from types that are heavier than the Liquidmetal racquet. Overall, this product should be a breeze to control even for the clumsiest of person, it has the traits that are crucial to managing your general tennis play and executing drastic momentary plays.

Comfort

Older players or ones with major health issues can find solace in the fact that the Liquid Metal 8 racquet is designed with comfort in mind, the vibration caused by the friction between the ball and the racquet is kept to a bare minimum, reducing whiplash-related effects.

Head have described their racquet as having the right balance of power, control and comfort and we’re inclined to agree. The lightweight mass means you don’t have to lumber around a heavy stick and you can effortlessly perform the moves you want without the fear of a sprain or injury.

Spin

Head’s racquet strings are something to behold, the synthetic core combined with a mindful 16 x 19 pattern ensures the ball has enough spin to race across the court. Durability is a major plus of this product, the strings specifically, they will keep you playing for a long time and playing with the utmost control.

The strings’ fabric is ridiculously strong, you won’t have to worry about replacing your racquet for a while as the material used to build this beast is second to none, in both the quality and sturdiness department.

Serves

Serving the ball can be a particular pain as you don’t have the momentum of a current game pushing you along, it can be difficult to rile up the energy to perform a winning serve.

The Head racquet’s non-slip grip lets you extend your arm and concentrate your energy on delivering power, it works with you, not against you and allows for a great serving technique. This requires the player to take initiative however, you must master the style and practice to become a competent server.

Groundstrokes

This is an occasional shot on the court that you must be able to pull off, this racquet is extremely versatile in its application, you can react to an opponent’s plays with ease and hit winning shots from the toughest court positions.

Groundstrokes, in particular, are a strong point of the racquet, you can deliver perfect topspin shots as the manmanufacturers have added the compatibility in this latest iteration and allow the head to flow across the ground for a winning shot, this is all possible without the slightest terrain-related hiccup.

Conclusion

All in all, the way Head’s racquet prioritises the four core components of power, comfort, control and durability without skimping on the quality of any individual aspect is remarkable.

This product opens the door to tennis as a pastime or even as a competitive sport, its affordability allows intermediate players to try the sport without breaking the bank and being pummelled with extra features that a high-end racquet would’ve needlessly provided.

That’s not to say that modifications aren’t cool but the Head racquet caters to beginners by offering the sport to them in a natural way. A newbie can be easily overwhelmed with the features of a tennis racquet, so it’s best to leave the high-end ones to when you have some experience under your belt. This is a great and inexpensive choice for anyone looking to get their feet wet in the sport of tennis.

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